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Top 5 series that got better

Series that got better T5W

Happy Wednesday! (whop whop) This week’s topic is series that got better. This is an interesting topic because usually it goes the other way, haw. I’ll have to dig to see if I can come up with five. 😛

If you’d like to join T5W, you can do so here.


5 – Losing It trilogy by Cora Carmack

Faking It (Losing It, #2)I’ve only read the first two so far, but the second one is my opinion is much better than the first. Not saying the first was bad persay, it was just kinda… bland. The main character didn’t really have much personality other than ‘stereotypical super-shy virgin’, which in itself isn’t a bad thing, but hey, you need to have hobbies or a personality other than that one trait, man. Humans have that stuff, this character didn’t. The couple the second book Faking It focuses on is a lot more developed personality-wise and I enjoyed their dynamic a lot more. This is a new adult series so beware of boobs and wiggly bits if you’re a youngin’.

4 – The Remnant Chronicles by Mary E Pearson

The Kiss of Deception (The Remnant Chronicles, #1)This is another one I’ve only read the first two of (I’ll get to the third here pretty quickly) but the first book was just okay for me I think. Nothing really stuck out as interesting or unique and the goofy love-triangle they threw in there was a bit tiring honestly. It’s definitely still there in the second book, but the world itself is more fleshed out and I really, really liked the direction it took. The second book along with the world building, had better characterization as well. I think the ‘middle book syndrome’ that most series get was actually present in book one for this series and had solved itself by book two. I’m hoping book three will be even better.

3 – A Court of Thorns and Roses trilogy by Sarah J Maas

A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #1)I feel like this one is going to be very popular on this week’s list for YA readers. It’s like the quintessential ‘was sucky and then ended up less sucky’ series. The first one is okay – I actually thought it was a decent book. I saw its issues but overall the book was not bad. The second book ended up being one of my favorites of this year, one of my favorites ever, which is strange since neither books 1 or 3 came anywhere near my favorites list. I think it was just so polar opposite from the first book that I couldn’t help but love it.

2 – The Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking, #1)Let me start by saying that this series is amazing the whole way through. The only reason it’s on my list is because for me, the first book was about 4 stars and the last two were 5 each. Technically, it means the series got better as it progressed :”D

If you haven’t read this one yet, do it. Do it. It was super popular for a while a couple years ago, but it has earned all the notoriety it has received. AHHHH read it ❤

1 – The Liveship Traders trilogy by Robin Hobb

Ship of Magic (Liveship Traders, #1)I think this series has the most pronounced improvement of all the ones on my list. Note, I am about 100 pages away from finishing at this point, so it’s the most fresh in my mind as well. The first book Ship of Magic is good – I gave it about four stars, but the characters in there are all really grating on the nerves and emotionally, the series is exhausting…. well, that second part never really goes away. It’s consistently emotionally exhausting. But! The character arcs in this book are fantastic. I went from barely liking anyone to really liking (or in some cases really, really loathing) almost everyone. Seeing the development really made me fall for this series and made reading it a more intense and absorbing experience. It’s just so good. It’s so good. 


And that’s it! That’s it for me this bleary Wednesday morning. Happy reading! :”D

 
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Posted by on 07/26/2017 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki | Blabber

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A Tale for the Time BeingA Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki
Magical Realism, 422 pages
Audio book, listened June 3rd-20th
Spoiler-free

A Tale for the Time Being is a book that made me feel like crying the whole time I was reading it. I never actually did, but the tone of the book had me consistently feeling like I wanted to bawl. I always felt like I was right at the brink of something bad happening and that the next page would bring tragedy or heartbreak.

The tone, therefore, is the most poignant part of this book. It gives it that longing feeling, the one you get when you feel like you’re missing something but you’re not quite sure what it is. Reading this, I felt like I was grasping for an unknown thing, a mood or an event or a memory that I never got to claim. And finishing it left me feeling… a bit empty.

This book is told is told in dual perspective: one being Nao, a teenager in Tokyo whose diary entries we read. She, like a lot of teenagers, is a bit lost in the void. Her family life leaves her feeling out of place, out of sorts. So she turns to writing the diary and through it the reader learns of her suicidal ideation and her father’s as well. We also learn of Nao’s century-old great grandmother, the anarchist, feminist, novelist, Zen Buddhist nun, Jiko, whom Nao decides write about. Jiko I think is one of my favorite characters. For such a frail, tiny person, she definitely has one of the most pronounced personalities out of all the characters in the book.

The other perspective is from Ruth (named after the author, I realized – the character’s husband has the same name as the author’s husband. Miiiiighty suspect!). Ruth at the beginning of the book finds a piece of plastic trash washed up along the shoreline where she lives. She picks it up to throw it away and inside finds Nao’s diary, ten years after she’s written it. The story bounces back and forth between Nao’s diary entries and Ruth’s reading of them. It was a pretty neat dynamic, honestly. I rather enjoyed it.

As I said before, the tone is the most pronounced thing in the book – it’s present consistently and gives the whole narrative a somber feeling. If this book could be described using a color, it would be gray. Reading from a suicidal sixteen-year-old’s perspective is a very draining experience, especially when along with her own feelings, has to deal with her father’s suicide attempts as well. The whole thing gave me the sensation similar to that when you’re waiting for someone to run into something or fall down – you just know it’s going to happen, so you’re wincing preemptively. That is what this book felt like. I was just waiting for something to happen. It made me feel anxious.

That being said, the characters in this book all had their ups and downs. I think Jiko and Ruth’s husband Oliver were the only two characters I really liked – everyone else was very uh… I don’t wanna say grating, but kinda grating. Nao, while invoking feelings of sympathy and sadness, also annoyed me. She was bullied relentlessly but didn’t hesitate when she was given the chance to be the bully herself to someone even weaker than she was. It made me lose a lot of empathy towards her and regard her more coolly. Ruth was more bearable I think, but I kept feeling like she took her husband for granted a lot of the time. Oliver, the character, is a quiet man interested whatever project has his attention – in the book, he was in the middle of trying to get non-native plants to grow in their area. While Ruth was obsessed with the diary, he was supportive but also trying to keep up his own thing. A lot of the time, Ruth would get annoyed about this. I mean really, the dude has to have his hobbies, let him be.

The magical realism element to this story is very subtle, at least throughout most of the book. It kinda jumps to the forefront after a while. That in itself was neat – I liked the whole aspect of it. When I picked up the book, I read the title as ‘A story for now’ or ‘A story for this moment’. But ‘Time Being’ will take on a whole new connotation by the time you’re done with this book. A Tale for the Time Being. I can’t think of it any other way now. Out of all the things about this book – the themes, the tones, the characters, this is the impression it has made on me. Time is not something we experience, it’s something we are.

The biggest complaint I had with this book is something I can’t go into detail on, because of spoilers. But I’ve said before that endings are make or break for me. And this one didn’t quite pull it off. Ten-minute explanations for things aren’t the way to end a book with as wide of a scope as this one. It was jilting, how quick it came, and then it was over. And it left a sour taste in my mouth. A sour taste on top of the emptiness I felt from reading the story as a whole. It was a weird combination, and I didn’t quite know how I felt about it.

Overall, I enjoyed this book. The ending, not so hot. The characters, hit or miss. But the tone, while it made me feel empty and uneasy, made me feel. It kept me reading, wanting to know what would happen. I appreciate any kind of book that can make me do that. So I liked this book for what it was and if you want a mellow, gray but at the same time weirdly addicting book, you might like it too.

Rating: 3.5/5 stars

 
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Posted by on 07/23/2017 in Books, Review

 

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24 in 48 Readathon

24in48

Guess what Iiiii’m doing! Well, at the time that this post is published, I’ll likely be sleeping (thank youuuu wordpress post scheduling). I had actually lost track of this readathon – I knew it had to be coming up but didn’t know exactly when until I saw Ranty Runt of a Reader‘s post about it (so thanks for posting it at the right time for my eyeballs to see it, friend).


If you’d like to know more about the readathon or sign-up super-last minute (if the sign up is still open, no idea), you can do so by following this link to the readathon’s blog.

It began this morning at 12:01am (I’m scheduling this post for 6am) and will continue through midnight Sunday night. The goal, as the title states, is to read 24 out of the 48 hours in the two days of the readathon.

We’ll see if I can get there, hah. Honestly, if I make 24, I’ll be totally shocked. If I make it to 12, I’ll be very satisfied with myself 😀 So wish me luck!

Aside from this post, I’ll be making periodic updates on my instagram account, so if you’d like to see photos of books (and… coffee and cats, let’s be real here) feel free to poke around. :”D Also, lemme know your usernames so I can follow you!

24 in 48 TBR

Ship of Destiny by Robin Hobb

Ship of Destiny (Liveship Traders, #3)I’ve mentioned this one quite a lot recently, so I’m not gonna go into detail about its plot. This is a buddy read I’m doing with Zezee, so I’m only gonna read up to what we have alloted for this week. So it counts towards the readathon, but I’m not gonna binge it.

 

 

The Broken Eye by Brent Weeks

The Broken Eye (Lightbringer, #3)I’ve been reading this book for months – it has been neglected lately though, so I’m gonna pick it up and buzz through hopefully a good bit of it. It’s a chunker, so I don’t see it getting finished, but who knows, anything is possible.

 

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (illustrated) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1)I’ve had this book on my shelf for ages – with the 3rd illustrated version coming out in October, it’s about time I read it.

 

 

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And that’s it! I might pick up a graphic novel here or there if I find myself feeling slumpy. Ideally, I’ll get all of these down (minus Ship of Destiny because mentioned above) – 24 hours should be plenty for that. Let’s just… hope I can read that much, hehe.

Happy reading!

 
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Posted by on 07/22/2017 in Books, Readathon

 

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Top 5 Books with non-western settings

Nonwestern settings T5W

Top 5 WednesdayHappy Hump Day! (whop whop) Today’s topic is books that aren’t set in or inspired by western influence. So nothing set in the US, nothing inspired by medieval Europe (so… a lot of fantasy with traditional monarchies, etc). Looking for Eastern, African or completely original social structures for this one. Lucky me, I’m a manga fanatic. 😛

If you would like to participate in T5W, here is the link to do so.


5 – Mushishi by Yuki Urushibara

Mushishi, Vol. 1

This is one of the most mellow series that I’ve ever read. It follows man as he aids various people in dealing with Mushi, creatures that have been around since the dawn of time. Not quite plant, not quite animal, not quite living, not quite dead, these creatures live among us, in our ears, in our pillows, among battles and bloodshed, by newborns and toddlers. Mushi are everywhere and most of the time are completely unnoticeable and harmless. Occassionally though, they wreak a bit of havoc, and the Mushishi, the main character, comes in to handle it.

This series is very slow-paced. It’s definitely more of a thinker series than an action-y one. The first volume is divided into two or three ‘cases’ of Mushi acting out of the norm and I’m assuming the remaining volumes follow the same structure. It’s definitely interesting though, and I recommend it if you’re wanting something with a bit of a surreal feeling to it.

4 – Saiyuki by Kazuya Minkura

Saiyuki, Vol. 1This is the second time I’ve mentioned this series rather recently, and I’m really happy about that. Any excuse to make this one relevant is okay by me – I feel like there’s a recent push in the online book community for those who usually just stick to books to get into manga too. I’ve been reading manga for more than a decade and now I’m all excited to be able to point out series that might not occur to someone new to manga to read, whether they be finished and out of print or ‘classics’ or just enjoyable but without the big buzz behind them.

This is one of those series. It’s definitely considered a classic and when it was being written, was definitely rather popular. I haven’t heard much about it from anyone else though, so I’m always looking for a chance to recommend it to new manga readers.

Saiyuki, drawing its influences from China, India and various other Asian countries, follows four characters as they trek across China towards India to solve the origins of the Minus Wave, a blast of energy that spread out across the land, driving all youkai to become frothing, uncontrollable creatures. The four characters are some of my favorite characters ever. A priest who is by no means preisty, a half demon, the legendary Monkey King and a demon whom I believe has one of the most heart-breaking and disturbing backsotries I’ve ever come across. This series. Is. SO. GOOD.

READ IT. AHHH.

3 – Stars Between the Sun and the Moon: One Woman’s Life in North Korea and Escape to Freedom by Lucia Jang

Stars Between the Sun and Moon: One Woman's Life in North Korea and Escape to FreedomI feel like memoirs from North Korean defectors are very important to read. The most well known one In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park, is also definitely worth the read, but I feel this one has just as much to say as any other. Each experience is unique but at the same time, paints a picture of North Korea that is becoming all too familiar.

This is the second North Korean Memoir I’ve read and it’s made me want to read more, it’s made me pay more attention to the news anytime I hear anything about North Korea. It’s definitely made me more aware of the world, and I recommend it.

2 – Inuyasha by Rumiko Takahashi

InuYasha: Turning Back Time (InuYasha, #1)This is the series that really got me into anime and manga. It wasn’t my first series, but it was pretty close to it. I’ll always have a soft spot in my heart for this one and will always return to it when feeling nostalgic for my teenage years.

This series follows Kagome, a young girl who falls down her family’s ancient well and is transported 500 years back in time to Feudal Japan, where all the youkai and spirits of Japanese myth are alive and thriving. She comes across Inuyasha, a half demon who is in a deep sleep, pinned to a tree. He awakens and the two find themselves stuck on a quest that will change their lives.

This series has comedy, action, romance, heart-break, horror aspects… it’s just so lovely. I adore this series. The anime as well as the manga is pretty great.

1 – The Good Women of China by Xinran

The Good Women of China: Hidden VoicesThis is another memoir of sorts, but I feel like it’s a lot more unique than your typical one. In the 1980s, Xinran, a woman in China, was given the opportunity to host a radio show. She decided to use it to allow Chinese women who would otherwise remain silent to call in and anonymously tell their stories to the world. This book is a collection of those stories. Some are happy, some are sad, some are heart-breaking, all are powerful in their own way.

I actually read this as assigned reading in one of my college classes back in 2010, but I buzzed through the whole thing in one sitting and now, 7 years later, the stories still stick with me. If you pick up any of the books on this list, make it this one.

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And that’s it! I’m going on a honeymoon in a bit over two weeks, so during that time, I’m hoping to pre-schedule posts to pop up while I’m gone. My goal is to write them all before I leave. So if you see a lull in my posting, it means I didn’t write as many as I had wanted to. 😛 Wish me luck!

Happy reading :”D

 
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Posted by on 07/19/2017 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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Monthly Recs: Auto-Read Authors

Monthly Recommendations Base

Hello! I’ve decided to pick up a new meme – this one is monthly, so I figured it’ll be doable to keep up with. :”D It’s called Monthly Recommendations and you can find out more about it here if you would like. Basically, they give you a topic each month and you make a post about it. So here is mine, woo.

I have a couple auto-reads that I’d like to mention:


Neal Stephenson

Neal StephensonBook that made me smitten with this author: Snow Crash

Goodreads Synopsis:

In reality, Hiro Protagonist delivers pizza for Uncle Enzo’s CosoNostra Pizza Inc., but in the Metaverse he’s a warrior prince. Plunging headlong into the enigma of a new computer virus that’s striking down hackers everywhere, he races along the neon-lit streets on a search-and-destroy mission for the shadowy virtual villain threatening to bring about infocalypse. Snow Crash is a mind-altering romp through a future America so bizarre, so outrageous…you’ll recognize it immediately.

You should read if: You want a Ready Player One that’s not juvenile, what it could have been if it had been a more fleshed out, character-driven book.

Books I own by this author: Snow Crash, Diamond Age, Interface, Quicksilver, Confusion, System World

Robin Hobb

Robin HobbBook that made me smitten with this author: Assassin’s Apprentice

Goodreads Synopsis:

Young Fitz is the bastard son of the noble Prince Chivalry, raised in the shadow of the royal court by his father’s gruff stableman. He is treated as an outcast by all the royalty except the devious King Shrewd, who has him secretly tutored in the arts of the assassin. For in Fitz’s blood runs the magic Skill–and the darker knowledge of a child raised with the stable hounds and rejected by his family.

As barbarous raiders ravage the coasts, Fitz is growing to manhood. Soon he will face his first dangerous, soul-shattering mission. And though some regard him as a threat to the throne, he may just be the key to the survival of the kingdom.

You should read if: You want to fall into a 90s fantasy kick for about 6 months…. because that’s what happened when I picked up this book.

Books I own by this author: Assassin’s Apprentice, Royal Assassin, Assassin’s Quest, Ship of Magic, The Mad Ship, Ship of Destiny, Fool’s Errand, Shaman’s Crossing

Naomi Novik

Naomi NovikBook that made me smitten with this author: His Majesty’s Dragon

Goodreads Synopsis:

Aerial combat brings a thrilling new dimension to the Napoleonic Wars as valiant warriors ride mighty fighting dragons, bred for size or speed. When HMS Reliant captures a French frigate and seizes the precious cargo, an unhatched dragon egg, fate sweeps Captain Will Laurence from his seafaring life into an uncertain future – and an unexpected kinship with a most extraordinary creature. Thrust into the rarified world of the Aerial Corps as master of the dragon Temeraire, he will face a crash course in the daring tactics of airborne battle. For as France’s own dragon-borne forces rally to breach British soil in Bonaparte’s boldest gambit, Laurence and Temeraire must soar into their own baptism of fire.

You should read if: You like fantasy or historical fiction. This is both! It’s so good – so well thought out, so tactical, so heart-twanging! It’s one of my all-time favorites

Books I own by this author: His Majesty’s Dragon, Throne of Jade, Black Powder War, Empire of Ivory, Victory of Eagles, Tongues of Serpents, Blood of Tyrants, Uprooted

Alan Campbell

Alan CampbellBook that made me smitten with this author: Scar Night

Goodreads Synopsis:

Suspended by chains over a seemingly bottomless abyss, the ancient city of Deepgate is home to a young angel, an assassin, and a psychotic murderer hungry for revenge or redemption. But soon a shocking betrayal will unite all three in a desperate quest…. The last of his line, Dill is descended from legendary Battle-archons who once defended the city. Forbidden to fly and untrained even to wield the great sword inherited from his forebears, he has become a figurehead for a dying tradition. Now he lives a sheltered existence in one of Deepgate’s crumbling temple spires under the watchful eye of the Presbyter who rules the city. Spine assassin Rachel Hael has better things to do than oversee the Presbyter’s angel. Each dark moon she must fight for her life among the city chains, hunting an immortal predator with a taste for blood. But when a traitor brings enemies to Deepgate’s doorstep, Dill and Rachel are forced into an uneasy alliance with the city’s oldest and most dangerous foe. They must journey down into the uncharted chasm to save their sprawling metropolis and themselves from annihilation. Once they descend however, they learn that what lies below is far more sinister than what they’ve been taught to expect.

You should read if: You like steampunk, fantasy, fascinating worlds, anti-heroes

Books I own by this author: Scar Night, Iron Angel, God of Clocks, Sea of Ghosts


I figured instead of me saying ‘AHHH THEY’RE SO GOOD, READ THEM!’ over and over for each author, I’d let the synopses of their works speak for themselves. If you have read any of these authors’ books or plan to, do let me know. :”D Happy reading!

 
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Posted by on 07/15/2017 in Books

 

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Top 5 children’s books

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Top 5 WednesdayHappy Wednesday! (whop whop) Today’s topic is favorite children’s books. Off to nostalgia-land we go!

If you’d like to join T5W, you can do so here.


5 – The Tawny Scrawny Lion by Kathryn Jackson

Tawny Scrawny LionThis was my favorite Golden Book when I was younger. This whole list could have been full of Golden Books but I feel like that might have gotten a bit repetitive. It’s about a lion who’s really hungry and ten rabbits to teach him to make carrot stew to avoid being eaten. It’s super cute and I’m gonna read it to my future kids.

 

4 – The Island of Giant Pokemon by Tracey West

Island of the Giant Pokemon (Pokemon Chapter Book, #2)This is another pick that this whole list could be dominated by. This is the second book in a what, 8 or 9 book series? Maybe more. Usually this series gets brought up when discussing topics like ‘Why I’m a Reader’ or ‘Childhood memories’ in blog posts. This series definitely got me reading and this one in particular stands out as the most memorable. I have my copies somewhere still – I think they’re at my parents’ house in storage. I need to go get them.

 

3 – Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

Inkheart (Inkworld, #1)When I was first starting my book collection, I’m talking actually making a conscious effort to buy and read books, I was about 12 I think. I had books before then, but I didn’t love buying books yet, if that makes sense. This book and its sequel were my first purchases. My dad convinced me to buy hard backs, which I had never done before. It was super neat and now I’m a hopeless case – books books everywhere and not a drop to drink!

 

2 – Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

Ella EnchantedThis is the first book I ever read that could be considered ‘romance’ to any degree. I was again probably 12 or so when I randomly picked it up at the library…. and then I proceeded to re-rent it over and over. I have probably read this book 20 times if not more. It’s definitely one of the cornerstones of my childhood reading development and I still have a really soft spot for it.

 

 

1 – Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, #1)This is number one for a few reasons: It sparked my love in fantasy (along with HP), it’s a really, really good series that I still enjoy as an adult, and it’s very easy to dish out as a recommendation for a young, budding reader. It follows a 12-year-old mastermind and his lethally trained butler named Butler. Artemis is neat but I love Butler. He’s definitely one of my favorite characters ever.

Wah, NOSTALGIA.

 

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And that’s it! Happy reading!

Coffee image designed by Onlyyouqj
 
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Posted by on 07/12/2017 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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May-June-y Book Haul | #18

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Hello, a haul today. And from this point until July 29th, I will not be purchasing any books. July 29th is the Half Price Books Clearance Sale and I’m gonna go bananas. So until then, I’m cutting myself off cold turkey. Part of me is all ‘nooooo~~~’ and the other part is ‘it’s like three weeks Emily, chill out – you’ll be fine’. 😛 I’ll probably be fine, haha.

In the meantime, I have corralled ten new books into my collection to tide me over.


20170709_094915The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

I FINALLY FOUND A COPY OF THIS DAMN BOOK. You have no idea how often I’ve been all ‘I’m gonna get this book’ and then there wasn’t any copies available. Could I have just ordered it online? Yes, but I wanted to buy it in person. I wanted the instant gratification of ‘I FOUND IT’ and I got it and it was splendid. From what I’ve heard, this is one of the staple ‘welcome to the fantasy genre’ books and I wanna read it.

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

I did it – I caved. I’ve been sooo hesitant about buying this book for ages after reading Shiver and disliking it. But pretty much everyone who I’ve seen read this book has enjoyed it, even the ones who disliked Shiver… so, here goes nothing.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

What? I didn’t have a hardback copy of HP1? Nope, nope I didn’t. My original Harry Potter set, the one I re-read a billion times when I was younger, was paperback for vols 1-4 and hardback for 5-7. Recently, I’ve been trying to buy the hardbacks for the first four to have a complete hardback collection. I’ve been trying to pick them up used as well. This is the last one that I needed – do you know how hard it is to find a used Sorcerer’s Stone?! I’ve come across tons of copies of 2-4, but this is the first copy of the first one that I’ve found. So I snatched it and now it’s mine.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

You know, I realized that I didn’t have any Austen books, nor have I actually read any. When my local B&N had a classics sale, I snatched up this book and the one I’m going to mention next. I figured this is the best entry for Austen I could get, since it seems to be the most loved. Wish me luck!

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

This is another book I realized that I didn’t have but seems to be a staple. So I got this one in the sale, too. Hopefully I’ll like it – I’m very hesitant. Me and classics don’t usually mesh too well. I might end up listening on audio honestly. It’s easier for me to get through them that way, haha.

20170709_095022Chew vol 2 by John Layman

I picked up the first volume of this in the last haul and while reading it, I found it just okay… until the last few pages and then dammit, I liked it and I needed to read the rest. So here we are.

Bitch Planet vol 1 by Kelly Sue DeConnick

This one has been on my radar for a while. A trip to the comic book store had me carrying it around, so woot. :”D I’ve heard lovely things about it!

Descender vol 1 by Jeff Lemire

This is one that I’ve only heard about recently. It sounds super cute and neat though, so when I saw it on the shelves, I grabbed it. I feel like I’m in a comic kick at the moment. I’m hoping to actually read this relatively soon. :”D

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Blankets by Craig Thompson

Guess who got a $40 hardback graphic novel for $10. Me, that’s who. Woot. I feel like most of the time, when I read a graphic novel, I can rarely give it 5 stars. I’m hoping that with the length of this one, it’ll allow for enough character development and world building to get that rating from me. Here’s to hoping!

Orange: The Complete Collection vol 1 by Ichigo Takano

I’ve actually read this one since buying it and I really, really enjoyed it 😀 I feel like if I break my ‘no books’ ban between now and the 29th, it’ll be for the other volume of this series. We’ll see if I can hold out. This was a nice, heart-twanging book. I really, really liked it.


And that’s it! Happy reading! :”D

 
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Posted by on 07/09/2017 in Book Haul, Books

 

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