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The book haul of wills | #20

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Hello, welcome to my last book haul before Christmas! If you read yesterday’s post, I won’t be buying any more books (save one) until after Christmas. The reasons for this are explained in that post.

So this is it, the test of my will. Going into it, at least my thoughts as of right now, I should be fine. My motivation to buy books has dwindled away to nothing. I feel like it’ll be harder mid-October or mid-November though, when that feeling has had a chance to return. So I figured I’ll start now when I’m motivated… or rather not motivated.


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Golden Fool by Robin Hobb

Golden Fool (Tawny Man, #2)This book I purchased in preparation for the likely-buddy read that Zezee and I will be doing. (We’re starting the first one tomorrow, so I figured we’d likely get to the second one before December, so…) But yay, our buddy reads won’t be hindered by my ban. :”D Woo. This is a sequel as stated, so no synopsis here. I haven’t even read it myself – spoilers, man.

 

 

Slade House by David Mitchell

Slade HouseI bought this on a whim at the book store because I saw it on clearance. I’ve been slowly collecting David Mitchell’s books, starting with Cloud Atlas but I have yet to actually read any of them… 😛 HENCE THE BAN. MOVING ON.

Goodreads synopsis:

Keep your eyes peeled for a small black iron door.

Down the road from a working-class British pub, along the brick wall of a narrow alley, if the conditions are exactly right, you’ll find the entrance to Slade House. A stranger will greet you by name and invite you inside. At first, you won’t want to leave. Later, you’ll find that you can’t. Every nine years, the house’s residents—an odd brother and sister—extend a unique invitation to someone who’s different or lonely: a precocious teenager, a recently divorced policeman, a shy college student. But what really goes on inside Slade House? For those who find out, it’s already too late. . . .

Spanning five decades, from the last days of the 1970s to the present, leaping genres, and barreling toward an astonishing conclusion, this intricately woven novel will pull you into a reality-warping new vision of the haunted house story—as only David Mitchell could imagine it.

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

The Bear and the Nightingale (The Bear and the Nightingale, #1)This one was very much an ‘I heard about this, it sounded really good’ purchase. Purely word of mouth that drove me to get this one. I’ve very excited for it. :”D There was also the ‘need to spend 10 more dollars to get free shipping’ motivational factor, too…

Goodreads synopsis:

At the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn’t mind—she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

After Vasilisa’s mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa’s new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa’s stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed—this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse’s most frightening tales.

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Six of Crows (Six of Crows, #1)This was actually a gift from my father. I took him to the bookstore and bought him a book for his birthday and he returned the favor because my birthday had been two weeks before and I had been on honeymoon at the time, so we didn’t get to celebrate it.

I completed the Grisha trilogy a while ago and rather liked it (except the ending, it was icky). But the ending wasn’t enough to make me not like the world in which the series took place, so here I am again. :”D

Goodreads synopsis:

Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker has been offered wealth beyond his wildest dreams. But to claim it, he’ll have to pull off a seemingly impossible heist:

Break into the notorious Ice Court
(a military stronghold that has never been breached)

Retrieve a hostage
(who could unleash magical havoc on the world)

Survive long enough to collect his reward
(and spend it)

Kaz needs a crew desperate enough to take on this suicide mission and dangerous enough to get the job done – and he knows exactly who: six of the deadliest outcasts the city has to offer. Together, they just might be unstoppable – if they don’t kill each other first.

The Fireman by Joe Hill

The FiremanThis book has been on my radar since before it came out. But being an adult ficiton, its price tag was a whopping 30 bucks so I held back from buying it right away. But a couple weeks ago my friendy Amanda texted me saying she saw it at the local bookstore on clearance, so I zoomed out there and bought a copy. :”D

Goodreads synopsis:

The fireman is coming. Stay cool.

No one knows exactly when it began or where it originated. A terrifying new plague is spreading like wildfire across the country, striking cities one by one: Boston, Detroit, Seattle. The doctors call it Draco Incendia Trychophyton. To everyone else it’s Dragonscale, a highly contagious, deadly spore that marks its hosts with beautiful black and gold marks across their bodies—before causing them to burst into flames. Millions are infected; blazes erupt everywhere. There is no antidote. No one is safe.

Harper Grayson, a compassionate, dedicated nurse as pragmatic as Mary Poppins, treated hundreds of infected patients before her hospital burned to the ground. Now she’s discovered the telltale gold-flecked marks on her skin. When the outbreak first began, she and her husband, Jakob, had made a pact: they would take matters into their own hands if they became infected. To Jakob’s dismay, Harper wants to live—at least until the fetus she is carrying comes to term. At the hospital, she witnessed infected mothers give birth to healthy babies and believes hers will be fine too. . . if she can live long enough to deliver the child.

Convinced that his do-gooding wife has made him sick, Jakob becomes unhinged, and eventually abandons her as their placid New England community collapses in terror. The chaos gives rise to ruthless Cremation Squads—armed, self-appointed posses roaming the streets and woods to exterminate those who they believe carry the spore. But Harper isn’t as alone as she fears: a mysterious and compelling stranger she briefly met at the hospital, a man in a dirty yellow fire fighter’s jacket, carrying a hooked iron bar, straddles the abyss between insanity and death. Known as The Fireman, he strolls the ruins of New Hampshire, a madman afflicted with Dragonscale who has learned to control the fire within himself, using it as a shield to protect the hunted . . . and as a weapon to avenge the wronged.

In the desperate season to come, as the world burns out of control, Harper must learn the Fireman’s secrets before her life—and that of her unborn child—goes up in smoke.

The Blinding Knife by Brent Weeks

The Blinding Knife (Lightbringer, #2)What what? I’ve been reading this series for ages, currently on the third one. This is the second one. It’s definitely become one of my favorites. :”D But when I first read this one, I did so on audio book, same for the first. So I’ve been trying to go back and collect them in hard back. This one, I finally found by chance at Half Price Books. I still haven’t found the first in hardback though. I have a paperback signed copy, which is really nice though :”D

No synopsis on this one either. Sequel!

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And that’s it! These are the last books I’ll be adding to my collection (except Harry Potter book) from now ’til Christmas. Coming soon is a full physical TBR list for me, to finally quantify exactly how little self-discipline I’ve had up until this point. I hope to improve that.

Happy reading!

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Posted by on 09/10/2017 in Book Haul, Books

 

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My brain told me I have enough books

So, a funny thing happened to me recently. Any of you who normally poke at my posts now and then saw that last month I went to a book clearance sale and got a pile of books. Before that, I did two or three library sales and got tons more… well, tomorrow I’ll be doing yet another book haul. This one, a normal one. No clearance or library sales here, so it’ll be about 6ish books or so. All of these books in the last few hauls were bought within what, four months? Five?

The funny thing happened this past Thursday: A friend and I went to a library sale together. It was $5 for a bag full of however many books you could stuff in there.

I didn’t buy a single book. I feel that I’ve finally finally hit that mental wall of ‘maybe I actually have enough’.

It was a really, really weird feeling. I found books that I’ve been looking for in that sale, but I had zero motivation to buy them. I think the trigger was my husband and I were discussing moving the other day (we’re doing it next month) and I mentioned that I would likely have to get a 6th book case in the process. The mental image of six book cases full of books was and is a lovely one, but I knew a huge portion of those would be unread for a long time, especially if I kept buying at my normal pace.

I guess my subconscious decided that ‘this is enough for now, you have plenty to read for years’ and therefore I felt no pleasure at the idea of buying a bag full of books at this library sale.

So guess who is putting myself on a ban. Time’s up, it me!

So from now until I’m going to say… Christmas, I will be buying zero books for myself, with one exception: The third illustrated Harry Potter book comes out in October. I’ve planned on getting that for months and will still get that. Other than that, 0 books. None.

Tomorrow’s post will be my last book haul until Christmas time. The Harry Potter book I get won’t get its own dedicated haul, but will likely just be mentioned in a wrap up or something. Tomorrow’s haul will have 6ish books in it and then next Saturday’s post (Wed being a T5W post…) will be a TBR post. I want to quantify exactly how many unread books I have. Most people (at least in the book community online) know or have an idea of this number. I honestly have no clue. It’s got to be over 200 at this point.

I want to see what my TBR is like now and then what it’s like at the end of the year. I want to see if and by how much this ban decreases it. I think from there one of my 2018 reading goals will be to decrease it further, the exact number to be decided.

I see a lot of book ban posts being made with a feeling of shame or determination or… whatever positive/negative energy that the person is feeling. I feel… neither of those. It’s weird. I don’t feel shame for having so many, I don’t feel super motivated to keep myself from buying books. I just… don’t feel any motivation to buy books at this point.

Apathy is the drive behind this one folks, woo.

So wish me luck. I both hope this lack-luster feeling lasts and that hope that it doesn’t. I don’t like the feeling. I’d much rather feel motivated to maintain self-control, haha.

Happy reading!

 

 

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 09/09/2017 in Book Discussion, Books

 

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14 by Peter Clines | Blabber

14 Blabber

1414 by Peter Clines
469 pages
Science Fiction
Read Aug 10 – Aug 19, 2017

This book is really weird.

I’m talking… really weird. But it’s weird in the ‘what in the world is going on’ kind of way, not the ‘I can’t follow this’ kind of way. It was easy to follow along with what was happening, but everything was happening was just so bizarre.

I really enjoyed it!

14 opens on the main character Nate, who’s looking for somewhere new to live. After receiving a recommendation about the Kavach House, a historical apartment building, he moves in. Shortly after doing so, he starts noticing little oddities about his apartment. You know, the usual: padlocked doors on random apartments, bright green cockroaches, a landlord that is weirdly protective of the building… Then he notices other oddities in neighboring apartments. And things just keep getting weirder and weirder from there.

Having read another book by Peter Clines that I knew was somewhat related to this book (The Fold) I kind of knew what I was getting into writing-style wise, character-development-wise and so on, so nothing in either of those categories really appalled me or blew me away. Clines isn’t a purple-prose writer, but he’s a pretty good one I think. He’s able to construct chapters in a way so that the last sentence makes you go ‘Damn it’ and flip the page to the next chapter. His books are really hard to put down.

That, combined with just the morbidly fascinating development of the plot had me reading this book at every available moment – I was on honeymoon when I picked this thing up, so that’s telling you something. Honey, want to get dinner now? Hold on, lemme finish this chapter! Sweetie, wanna hop off the cruise boat and tour the town? Hold on, two more sentences on this page! My husband was very understanding though, thankfully. (And now as I’m writing this, he’s picked up the book and read nearly a third of it last night – unheard of for him, haha).

To be fair, the reviews for this book are mixed. Most of the negative ones mention the pacing. The pacing is indeed a bit slow at the beginning. The weird stuff isn’t super in your face, it’s more little things that you read and go ‘huh’… they eventually delve into ‘wtf’ level weird things, but yes, the pacing is a bit slow. It’s well worth the wait though, in my opinion.

In addition, I always find it strange and somewhat forced when a romantic subplot is forced into a book that is definitely nowhere even close to romance. There’s one in here and at times it’s a bit ‘ehh’ to read. It’s minor though, so it shouldn’t ruin your entire read of the book.

Aside from the pacing and the awkward romance, I really have nothing negative to say about this book – it’s exciting, unnerving, wtf-y, and the ending I think is pretty solid. Considering all the weird, seemingly unrelated stuff that happens in the apartment, I think the author did a rather good job of relating and wrapping it all up nicely. It was refreshing.

Overall, a good choice if you’re looking for something to keep you flipping pages. I really enjoyed it and if you pick it up, let me know if you do, too. :”D

Rating: 4/5 stars

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 08/20/2017 in Books, Review

 

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Dreamy Book Covers Tag

Dreamy Covers

Hello, a tag today! 😀 This continues my pre-written posts, so pardon any slowness is reply. I was tagged by The Orangutan Librarian! So thanks, friend! 😀

  • Thank the person who tagged you.
  • Mention the creator of this tag (Tiana @ The Book Raven)
  • Use the original tag image in your post.
  • At least tag one fellow blogger for doing this tag!
  • List the rules.

No ideas but in things: A cover that perfectly expresses the novel inside it

The Traitor Baru CormorantThe Traitor Baru Cormorant by Seth Dickinson

Dark and lovely: a cover so creepilicious that you want to eat it up

Priest, Volume 1. Prelude for the DeceasedPriest volume 1: Prelude for the Deceased by Min-Woo Hyung

Sugary sweet: A cute cover so fluffy you want to give it a hug

I Could Pee on This And Other Poems by CatsI Could Pee on This and Other Poems by Cats by Francesco Marciuliano

The Simple Aesthetic: A cover that stuns with the most minimal of designs

The Bone ClocksThe Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Cover Envy: A book you wish you had on your shelves but don’t yet

Orange: The Complete Collection, Vol. 2Orange: The Complete Collection volume 2 by Ichigo Takano

Traveling abroad: A book cover featuring a country outside your own

RookRook by Sharon Cameron

The color wheel: A cover that showcases your favorite colors

The Bitter Kingdom (Fire and Thorns, #3)The Bitter Kingdom by Rae Carson

Changing gears: A cover change that you absolutely adore

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1)Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

Oldie but goodie: A favorite cover of your favorite classic

FrankensteinFrankenstein by Mary Shelley


And that’s it! Happy reading! :”D

 
9 Comments

Posted by on 08/13/2017 in Book Tag, Books, Uncategorized

 

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A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki | Blabber

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A Tale for the Time BeingA Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki
Magical Realism, 422 pages
Audio book, listened June 3rd-20th
Spoiler-free

A Tale for the Time Being is a book that made me feel like crying the whole time I was reading it. I never actually did, but the tone of the book had me consistently feeling like I wanted to bawl. I always felt like I was right at the brink of something bad happening and that the next page would bring tragedy or heartbreak.

The tone, therefore, is the most poignant part of this book. It gives it that longing feeling, the one you get when you feel like you’re missing something but you’re not quite sure what it is. Reading this, I felt like I was grasping for an unknown thing, a mood or an event or a memory that I never got to claim. And finishing it left me feeling… a bit empty.

This book is told is told in dual perspective: one being Nao, a teenager in Tokyo whose diary entries we read. She, like a lot of teenagers, is a bit lost in the void. Her family life leaves her feeling out of place, out of sorts. So she turns to writing the diary and through it the reader learns of her suicidal ideation and her father’s as well. We also learn of Nao’s century-old great grandmother, the anarchist, feminist, novelist, Zen Buddhist nun, Jiko, whom Nao decides write about. Jiko I think is one of my favorite characters. For such a frail, tiny person, she definitely has one of the most pronounced personalities out of all the characters in the book.

The other perspective is from Ruth (named after the author, I realized – the character’s husband has the same name as the author’s husband. Miiiiighty suspect!). Ruth at the beginning of the book finds a piece of plastic trash washed up along the shoreline where she lives. She picks it up to throw it away and inside finds Nao’s diary, ten years after she’s written it. The story bounces back and forth between Nao’s diary entries and Ruth’s reading of them. It was a pretty neat dynamic, honestly. I rather enjoyed it.

As I said before, the tone is the most pronounced thing in the book – it’s present consistently and gives the whole narrative a somber feeling. If this book could be described using a color, it would be gray. Reading from a suicidal sixteen-year-old’s perspective is a very draining experience, especially when along with her own feelings, has to deal with her father’s suicide attempts as well. The whole thing gave me the sensation similar to that when you’re waiting for someone to run into something or fall down – you just know it’s going to happen, so you’re wincing preemptively. That is what this book felt like. I was just waiting for something to happen. It made me feel anxious.

That being said, the characters in this book all had their ups and downs. I think Jiko and Ruth’s husband Oliver were the only two characters I really liked – everyone else was very uh… I don’t wanna say grating, but kinda grating. Nao, while invoking feelings of sympathy and sadness, also annoyed me. She was bullied relentlessly but didn’t hesitate when she was given the chance to be the bully herself to someone even weaker than she was. It made me lose a lot of empathy towards her and regard her more coolly. Ruth was more bearable I think, but I kept feeling like she took her husband for granted a lot of the time. Oliver, the character, is a quiet man interested whatever project has his attention – in the book, he was in the middle of trying to get non-native plants to grow in their area. While Ruth was obsessed with the diary, he was supportive but also trying to keep up his own thing. A lot of the time, Ruth would get annoyed about this. I mean really, the dude has to have his hobbies, let him be.

The magical realism element to this story is very subtle, at least throughout most of the book. It kinda jumps to the forefront after a while. That in itself was neat – I liked the whole aspect of it. When I picked up the book, I read the title as ‘A story for now’ or ‘A story for this moment’. But ‘Time Being’ will take on a whole new connotation by the time you’re done with this book. A Tale for the Time Being. I can’t think of it any other way now. Out of all the things about this book – the themes, the tones, the characters, this is the impression it has made on me. Time is not something we experience, it’s something we are.

The biggest complaint I had with this book is something I can’t go into detail on, because of spoilers. But I’ve said before that endings are make or break for me. And this one didn’t quite pull it off. Ten-minute explanations for things aren’t the way to end a book with as wide of a scope as this one. It was jilting, how quick it came, and then it was over. And it left a sour taste in my mouth. A sour taste on top of the emptiness I felt from reading the story as a whole. It was a weird combination, and I didn’t quite know how I felt about it.

Overall, I enjoyed this book. The ending, not so hot. The characters, hit or miss. But the tone, while it made me feel empty and uneasy, made me feel. It kept me reading, wanting to know what would happen. I appreciate any kind of book that can make me do that. So I liked this book for what it was and if you want a mellow, gray but at the same time weirdly addicting book, you might like it too.

Rating: 3.5/5 stars

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 07/23/2017 in Books, Review

 

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May-June-y Book Haul | #18

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Hello, a haul today. And from this point until July 29th, I will not be purchasing any books. July 29th is the Half Price Books Clearance Sale and I’m gonna go bananas. So until then, I’m cutting myself off cold turkey. Part of me is all ‘nooooo~~~’ and the other part is ‘it’s like three weeks Emily, chill out – you’ll be fine’. 😛 I’ll probably be fine, haha.

In the meantime, I have corralled ten new books into my collection to tide me over.


20170709_094915The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

I FINALLY FOUND A COPY OF THIS DAMN BOOK. You have no idea how often I’ve been all ‘I’m gonna get this book’ and then there wasn’t any copies available. Could I have just ordered it online? Yes, but I wanted to buy it in person. I wanted the instant gratification of ‘I FOUND IT’ and I got it and it was splendid. From what I’ve heard, this is one of the staple ‘welcome to the fantasy genre’ books and I wanna read it.

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

I did it – I caved. I’ve been sooo hesitant about buying this book for ages after reading Shiver and disliking it. But pretty much everyone who I’ve seen read this book has enjoyed it, even the ones who disliked Shiver… so, here goes nothing.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

What? I didn’t have a hardback copy of HP1? Nope, nope I didn’t. My original Harry Potter set, the one I re-read a billion times when I was younger, was paperback for vols 1-4 and hardback for 5-7. Recently, I’ve been trying to buy the hardbacks for the first four to have a complete hardback collection. I’ve been trying to pick them up used as well. This is the last one that I needed – do you know how hard it is to find a used Sorcerer’s Stone?! I’ve come across tons of copies of 2-4, but this is the first copy of the first one that I’ve found. So I snatched it and now it’s mine.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

You know, I realized that I didn’t have any Austen books, nor have I actually read any. When my local B&N had a classics sale, I snatched up this book and the one I’m going to mention next. I figured this is the best entry for Austen I could get, since it seems to be the most loved. Wish me luck!

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

This is another book I realized that I didn’t have but seems to be a staple. So I got this one in the sale, too. Hopefully I’ll like it – I’m very hesitant. Me and classics don’t usually mesh too well. I might end up listening on audio honestly. It’s easier for me to get through them that way, haha.

20170709_095022Chew vol 2 by John Layman

I picked up the first volume of this in the last haul and while reading it, I found it just okay… until the last few pages and then dammit, I liked it and I needed to read the rest. So here we are.

Bitch Planet vol 1 by Kelly Sue DeConnick

This one has been on my radar for a while. A trip to the comic book store had me carrying it around, so woot. :”D I’ve heard lovely things about it!

Descender vol 1 by Jeff Lemire

This is one that I’ve only heard about recently. It sounds super cute and neat though, so when I saw it on the shelves, I grabbed it. I feel like I’m in a comic kick at the moment. I’m hoping to actually read this relatively soon. :”D

20170709_095056

Blankets by Craig Thompson

Guess who got a $40 hardback graphic novel for $10. Me, that’s who. Woot. I feel like most of the time, when I read a graphic novel, I can rarely give it 5 stars. I’m hoping that with the length of this one, it’ll allow for enough character development and world building to get that rating from me. Here’s to hoping!

Orange: The Complete Collection vol 1 by Ichigo Takano

I’ve actually read this one since buying it and I really, really enjoyed it 😀 I feel like if I break my ‘no books’ ban between now and the 29th, it’ll be for the other volume of this series. We’ll see if I can hold out. This was a nice, heart-twanging book. I really, really liked it.


And that’s it! Happy reading! :”D

 
13 Comments

Posted by on 07/09/2017 in Book Haul, Books

 

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The Mid-Year Book Freakout Tag

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Wasn’t it just two days ago or something that everyone was gripin’ about it being 2016 and it still being 2016 and it still still being 2016? Now 2017 is half way over. D: Guys, I’m turning 27 this year – I dun wanna!

I’ve done this tag before, but this is one that’s definitely redo-able every year. 😀 And I was even tagged this year! Ann @AnnsReadingCorner tagged me and I saw it and went ‘What! No, it’s way too early for this tag’. And then I realized it was June. AHH DAMN YOU SPACE TIME CONTINUUM.

Anyways, if you’re interested, here is my 2015 post.


The best book you’ve read so far this year

I mentioned this in my last post, but by far it’s the Lightbringer series by Brent Weeks. This has quickly become one of my favorite series ever. It follows a handful of character in kingdom threatened by betrayal and war. The magic system in this book is really neat: The users, called ‘Drafters’, can take in visible light and ‘draft’ it into physical material. Most people can only draft one or two colors. A few can draft more. But only The Prism, the religious and political head of the country, can draft all of them. So those who can draft are assets to a kingdom – they populate the government and the army. They’re taught to hone their skills in a training school. And the more a drafter uses her abilities, the quicker that drafter is brought to death. Using the magic kills a person from the inside out.

This series is so good, man. I’m currently in the middle of the third book. There are four out total and I think there will be a fifth.

Your favorite sequel of the year

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2)In lieu of just naming the above series again, I choose A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J Maas. I read the entire trilogy this year, and this was my favorite out of the three by far. The first one was decent by Tamlin rubbed me the wrong way and the third one’s plot was just a bit too convenient. Like, the plot-points were all very uh… predictable, I guess. Not super great. But the second one, I loved. Oh, I know that this series has its issues as a whole, this book included, but this book was such a fresh breath of air after reading Acotar.

A new release you haven’t read but really want to

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland has caught my eye. It came out all of five days ago, so that’s why I haven’t gotten to it yet. :”D The name ‘Neal Stephenson’ pulled me in and then the goofy synopsis of this book kept me here. The following is from Goodreads:

When Melisande Stokes, an expert in linguistics and languages, accidently meets military intelligence operator Tristan Lyons in a hallway at Harvard University, it is the beginning of a chain of events that will alter their lives and human history itself. The young man from a shadowy government entity approaches Mel, a low-level faculty member, with an incredible offer. The only condition: she must sign a nondisclosure agreement in return for the rather large sum of money.

Tristan needs Mel to translate some very old documents, which, if authentic, are earth-shattering. They prove that magic actually existed and was practiced for centuries. But the arrival of the scientific revolution and the Age of Enlightenment weakened its power and endangered its practitioners. Magic stopped working altogether in 1851, at the time of the Great Exhibition at London’s Crystal Palace—the world’s fair celebrating the rise of industrial technology and commerce. Something about the modern world “jams” the “frequencies” used by magic, and it’s up to Tristan to find out why.

And so the Department of Diachronic Operations—D.O.D.O. —gets cracking on its real mission: to develop a device that can bring magic back, and send Diachronic Operatives back in time to keep it alive . . . and meddle with a little history at the same time. But while Tristan and his expanding operation master the science and build the technology, they overlook the mercurial—and treacherous—nature of the human heart.

So what: Sci-fi, magic, thriller, time-travel… I need it man. It’s gonna be mine.

Most anticipated release for the second half of the year

Solutions and Other ProblemsIn theory this book is coming out September 7th, but take that with a grain of salt: it’s been pushed back a few times now.

Solutions and Other Problems by Allie Brosh is my most-anticipated release coming up. A follow-up/continuation/whatevs to Hyberbole and a Half, it follows similar themes and I’m sure it’s going to be as funny and meaningful as the first one. I’m super excited for it. 😀

 

Your biggest disappointment

WeaveworldThat would be Weaveworld by Clive Barker. I don’t know what it was about this book, but it just didn’t grab me. I got to slightly below half-way and had to call it a day. The worst part is that this is one of my mother’s favorite books and now I have to tell her I didn’t like it. I still haven’t given it back to her yet because it’s a conversation I don’t wanna have. xD

 

 

Biggest surprise of the year

Shadow and Bone (Shadow and Bone, #1)The Darkling from the Grisha trilogy. And yeah, I know the question is asking for a book, but this character was my biggest surprise. This character resparked my obsession with fanfiction hawhaw, and it came waaay out of left field. Weird. 😀

 

 

 

Favorite new to you or debut author

Brent Weeks, whom I mentioned above. He’s great. :”D Totes mcgoats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your new fictional crush

Nuuuupe.

New favorite character

I choose Kip Guile from Weeks’ Lightbringer series. He’s just the greatest :”D AND I’LL STOP MENTIONING THIS SERIES SOON, I SWEAR.

A book that made you cry

None…. yet

A book that made you happy

…this is me trying really hard not to mention Weeks’ series again…

Your favorite book to movie adaption that you’ve seen this year

A Monster CallsMost definitely A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness (well… its expanded release was Jan 6th, so it counts. It counts. If you haven’t read this yet.. please do. Get the illustrated version, it makes the book.

 

 

 

Favorite book post you’ve done so far

….hehehehe

That would be my On Borrow Books: A Harrowing Tale of Betrayal post. No contest, man. If you want to read it, prepare to have your jimmies rustled.

The most beautiful book you bought/received this year

That would easily be Saturn Run by John Sanford and Ctein… I’m just gonna link my instagram video of the thing. Man, I can’t get over it!

IT'S SO LOVELY 😢 . . . #bookstagram #bookhaul #books #beautiful

A post shared by Emily (@embuhley) on

What are some books you need to read by the end of the year?

Everything on my 17 in 2017 list, man. I’m slacking. I’M SLACKING.


and that’s it! I’m currently sitting at 27/50 books read for the year, so sliiiiightly ahead of schedule. Now that I’m working full time and spending 3hrs/day commuting on top of that, we’ll see if I can keep up the pace, haha.

Happy reading!

 
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Posted by on 06/29/2017 in Book Tag, Books, Uncategorized

 

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