The Broken Eye by Brent Weeks | Blabber

The Broken Eye (Lightbringer, #3)The Broken Eye by Brent Weeks
The Lightbringer series, Book 3
846 pages
Hardcover/audio book
Read Feb 16, 2017 – Jan 12, 2018
Spoilery blabber

This series just keeps getting better and better.

I first read The Black Prism, book one in this series, a year ago – it made my top books of 2017 list, as did its sequel, The Blinding Knife. And while it took me nearly a year to read this one too, that didn’t mean I loved it any less. This series is one that I savor. I actually ended up restarting this book half way through, which is why it took me so long. I originally was reading a physical copy, but I missed the narrator’s interpretation: Simon Vance does a spectacular job narrating this audio book. He’s just fantastic. He hooked me onto following narrators, like, looking for books narrated by a person, and then listening to that book specifically for that voice. I looooove Simon Vance’s voice. So as I said, I savor this series while I read it. It’s just so delicious and wonderful and I wanna be in it forever.

My favorite thing about this series is the magic system and how it’s incorporated so very deeply into the economy, the government and the well-being of pretty much everyone. Being able to draft luxin is probably the most marketable and influential skill one could have – even if they were complete shit at everything else, being able to draft a bit of blue or a bit of red would feed them and likely their families as well. It’s just fascinating.

And my second favorite thing is the cast of characters. All of them, whether I love them or hate them, they’re good characters. Like Kip for instance – he went through a lot of character development in this book. He went from being somewhat unsure of himself but slowly getting there, to a leader of a group, smoochin’ girls and feeling sure of himself. Leading accidental revolutions! Killin’ people! Kip is a good egg.

john nobleAlso, Andross Guile is a right git, man. I love him. He’s such a bastard  I think what makes him so wonderfully awful is that in his mind, he thinks he’s doing what’s right. Like, his driving force behind his actions is the desire to see his country run in a way that would bring peace. And I mean, technically, it will, but like… that’s a lot of lives, man. He’s so intelligent, so manipulative, always one step ahead of basically everyone else. I love him, but I wanna through a brick at his head. Augh he’s just so great. I’ve totally fan-casted him too. John Noble, all the way. He’s definitely my Andross Guile. And I don’t know yet if his uh.. goals, become darker in book four, but from the events at the end of book three, I’m thinking they might. I think he’s the best kinda-noble-villain I’ve ever come across. Definitely Lawful Evil.

The other characters too, get a bit more screen time for us to get into their minds. Zymun even got a bit. I think, at the moment, he’s the only character who’s really underdeveloped. All I’m picking up from him so far is ‘chaotic evil just because’. I have yet to discern his motivations, so hopefully that’ll happen in book four, now with him as Prism Elect. He has to get more chapters from his POV right? Right? wah.

Liv as well, I kinda missed reading more from her POV. She didn’t get many chapters this time around but the ones she did get were rather satisfying. Obviously she’s been in rank with the color prince for the past what, two books? Finally, finally, she’s seen sense. Goodness. And now she has to go crawling back to the Chromeria in hopes that she can be forgiven. I know that if they don’t wanna forgive her, her dad would take her in in a heartbeat (her dad btw, is one of my favorite characters. He’s just such a hulking teddy bear cutie pie).

I’m predicting she’ll run into Kip’s group, they’ll do a bout of ‘can’t we trust her?’, she’ll do something to prove herself, and then all will be well. Watch, I predict it.

 

And then finally, we come to The Order of the Broken Eye, the group the whole book revolves around. This group is such a weird, mysterious thing. And Weeks definitely led me into a false sense of security concerning them. I thought, ‘Oh, they’re trying to infiltrate via Teia and doing assassinations via Murder Sharp (who is the weirdest guy by the way) but lol nope. Nope nope, the ending of the book absolutely blew me away man.

Best ending ever. We find out that Ironfist, one of my favorite characters, the one that everyone seems to trust implicitly, has been in on it the whole time. The whole time. And Grimwoody man. I was at work when I was listening to the end of the audiobook – I listen while I code.

And so I’m sitting there, working and listening, and this big plot twist drops. And I sit there and my fingers still on my keyboard and my eyes bug out. And in my otherwise silent room with my two coworkers, I basically yell, ‘OH NO WAY.’ And then I pause it, get up and take a lap around the building because I just couldn’t handle it, man. I needed to move! My brain was like WHAT IS GOING ON?!

I love those kinds of endings. They’re the best.

So yeah, I loved this book.

5/5 stars

September Currently Reading

September Currently ReadingSo, it has dropped from about 85 degrees F to maybe 55 degrees F here in the last two days. It’s full-on fall weather now AND I HOPE IT STAYS THIS WAY. I hate the heat so much. I’m very much a fall and winter person.

Chilly weather makes me wanna be under a blanket with fluffy socks, coffee and a book. It’s perfect reading weather. :”D


Currently, I am reading two novels:

Embassytown by China Mieville

EmbassytownThis one I feel like I should be loving, but I’m not. I’m honestly on the verge of putting it down. Not DNFing it, just… changing my reading format. Currently, I’m listening on audiobook and usually that’s all fine and dandy, but the narrator has the most irritating voice and the quality of the recording is kinda flat, like all the ‘s’ sounds comes out almost like a static noise. I feel like if I would pick it up via physical copy, all my irritations with the thing would totally disappear. I’m too busy being annoyed by the narrator that I’m barely paying attention to the plot… hence it’s not sticking with me, hence I’m not liking it, blah de blah.

And honestly writing this out has solidified my choice of switching formats. I’ve had a physical copy forever so I’ll just read that one. I’ll eat the scribd credit I spent on the thing I guess. Better than forcing myself through 6 more hours of that.

Aside from my irritations, this book sounds pretty decent: It’s about a woman who is used as a simile by an alien race whose language has no concept of things that aren’t currently present. Like, if they need to make a comparison, the object in question and the comparator both need to be present, hence, she’s always dragged around with them. The language itself is fascinating too: That’s the one thing I do like about the audiobook. The language sounds so neat! It’s like two voices layered on top of each other – the aliens have two mouths and speak simultaneously. For humans to speak it, they need a partner with a close mind-connection, enough so that they can each speak out one voice of the word in perfect harmony at all times.

Like I said, really cool. I really like the concept. I just… wanna change formats to enjoy it. Woof.

The Broken Eye by Brent Weeks

The Broken Eye (Lightbringer, #3)This one, I’ve been reading for ages. I’ve likely gone over the synopsis of this series a billion times at this point. Needless to say, I’m loving it. Just need to actually finish it.


And since I’m going to drop Embassytown as an audiobook, I’ll likely pick up another one pretty quick. I’m thinking The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss but not 100% positive yet. Otherwise, that’s it. :”D Happy reading!

The Black Prism by Brent Weeks | Blabber

The Black Prism (Lightbringer, #1)The Black Prism by Brent Weeks
The Lightbringer series, book 1
Fantasy
Listened on audiobook Dec 29, 2016 – Feb 2, 2017

No spoilers this time around. Safe to read.

The Black Prism is the first book in the currently-four-book Lightbringer series by Brent Weeks. I had heard of the author before, but I hadn’t read anything by him until now.

Let me tell you man, I’m a fan. From what I’ve heard, his writing is polarizing in a way that you’ll either like his style or you won’t. Well, I like it. I really like it, actually. After I finish this series, I’m going to go hunt down his other one.

This series follows the Prism, a man named Gavin Guile who can fracture light into its individual colors and then draft those colors into physical matter called luxin, which can then be used like any other building material. This magic system is unique in that the more the wielder uses it, the faster it brings him or her to death. I’ve never read about a system that kills someone as they use it before. Other people in this world can use the magic as well, but most can only draft one or two colors. Some, superchromats, can draft more than that, but only the Prism can draft them all. I love the way Weeks described the magic system – I understood the mechanics of it without having to think much about it. It just flowed naturally into the story.

This book follows Guile along with three or four other characters, shifting perspectives as needed. I think this is the first time I’ve read a multiple POV book where I was interested in each character. None of the chapters were boring, none of them left me wondering if they were necessary. Each character contributed to the storyline and each one was understandable if not likeable.

Another main character in the story, Kip, Gavin Guile’s bastard son, was probably my favorite character. He was just so funny. An overweight teenager, his story begins in a small village where he’s being bullied daily by other boys living there. The story takes off quickly, him coming to interact with the other main characters and not feeling sure of himself while he does it. So what does he do? He resorts to humor to help himself cope. Kip is hysterical and I feel like I’d find him as a good person if he were to magically appear in front of me as a real human. Sure, he has the mind of a stereotypical hormonal teenage boy at times and the reader sees that when reading from his POV, but he’s not wholly crude and him noticing girls is also dotted with humor. He was just entertaining to read all around and I really enjoyed it.

The Black Prism aside from having humor and fantasy elements also has war and political intrigue elements. The Seven Satrapies, the land where this story take place, has a bloody past that’s not quite settled, leading to tension and torment and warfare. Each Satrapie has a unique culture that’s highlighted throughout the book, lending to the world’s fullness and development. And there’s a magic school! Well, it’s there. The book isn’t focused on it, but it’s there. Still enjoyable to read though. :”D

Overall, I loved this book. I loved this book. The audio narration just made it all the better, too. This is the first time I went out of my way to find out the name of the narrator and see what else he’s narrated so I can listen to him more. The version I listened to was narrated by Simon Vance. I know there are other narrators for this book who apparently aren’t that great, so if you decide to try out the audibook, get the Simon Vance version!! 😀 Oh my gosh, I’m smitten.

Favorite book of the year so far, I think. It’s tied with A Court of Mist and Fury. It was just so wonderful. I need to get a physical copy so I can reread it and love it and scribble in it and love it and love it.

Rating: 5/5 stars