We Are Never Meeting in Real Life by Samantha Irby | Blabber

We Are Never Meeting In Real LifeWe Are Never Meeting in Real Life by Samantha Irby
275 pages
Nonfiction/Memoir
Read Dec 27th 2017-Jan 4th, 2018
Spoiler free blabber

I bought this book because of the cat.

I was in Connecticut, visiting a friend who had moved away a couple years ago, and we were perusing the shelves in a local bookstore in New Haven, CT, when I decided I wanted to buy something different. I had been eyeing a few fantasy novels that have been on my radar, but who knows when I would get to them. So I wanted something that I knew nothing about, that would remind me of the trip due it being different to what I normally gravitate towards.

And then there was this book: bright yellow with a soggy cat on the front. And it spoke to me. I grabbed it, skimmed the back and saw that Roxanne Gay had blurbed it and that was enough for me. I bought it and began reading it that night.

This book was pretty much what I expected it to be, once I read more thoroughly what it was about. It’s one of those books that makes me want to write a book full of my blabberings, because that’s what it is. It had elements I found similar to Yes Please, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) and many other modern memoirs of women living in various states of life. I tend to like those kinds of books, so I ended up rather enjoying this one as well.

Samantha Irby strikes me as a person that I felt, what, partially similar to? I guess? Parts of her writing had me in hysterics from how close it hit to home. I was laughing way, way too hard at parts of this book, and the urge to meet this woman and shake her hand was really strong. Other parts I didn’t relate to, so I read those bits with interest, getting to see another perspective on things that I held a different opinion on, and expanding my world view at the same time.

Hey, it’s almost like we’re two people with our own thoughts and feelings, haha.

Overall though, I liked this book. Irby goes through various different stories of her life. A couple of them had me laughing so hard, a couple of them had me reading them out loud to my husband, trying not to crack up while I read, and seeing him shaking his head and smiling at me, waiting to see if I’d crumble under my giggles.

One of my favorite parts was the cat, Hellen Keller, whom the author brought home mostly against her will and then grew to grudgingly love. Helen was hysterical. The way she was narrated reminded me of every single female cat I’ve ever owned. She had such a ‘tude, I loved it.

Samantha Irby’s book will stick with me, I think. And that’s what I wanted when I bought it – a good experience reading that I could associate with hanging out with my friend in that one bookstore in Connecticut. So thank ya Ms Irby, you gave me a good few days as I read your writing, trying to keep my cat Nina from walking on the book like you had to finagle around Helen cat.

3.5/5 stars