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Monthly Recs: Oldies

Monthly Recs Oldies.png

Hello! Continuing my pre-written posts here, this month’s Monthly Recs theme is oldies! By Oldies, it means books published before 2010 (before 2010 is old?!?!) but hey, who am I to judge.


Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton

Jurassic Park (Jurassic Park, #1)Published in 1990

If you’ve seen the movie and liked it, I guarantee you’ll like the book. There’s so much more to the book than to the movie – there’s more archaeology, more backstory, more science – it’s all so cool! I listened to this on audio book last summer and adored it. I’ve seen gone on a Michel Crichton buying spree and own the majority of his books now. 😛 I haven’t purchased his latest book yet but I’ll get there soon enough!

From Goodreads:

A billionaire has created a technique to clone dinosaurs. From the DNA that his crack team of scientists extract, he is able to grow the dinosaurs in his laboratories and lock them away on an island behind electric fences, creating a sort of theme park. He asks a group of scientists from several different fields to come and view the park, but something goes terribly wrong when a worker on the island turns traitor and shuts down the power.

Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

Ella EnchantedPublished in 1997

This is one of those books that’s nostalgic for me. It was one of the ones that when I was little, I would rent out from the library and read over and over again. It’s a more fantastical take on the Cinderella story, but the female main character actually has a personality and can think for herself. It’s a lovely, fresh breath of air. Every time I mention it on here, I want to go back to read it. (Don’t watch the movie, it’s doo doo)

From Goodreads:

At birth, Ella is inadvertently cursed by an imprudent young fairy named Lucinda, who bestows on her the “gift” of obedience. Anything anyone tells her to do, Ella must obey. Another girl might have been cowed by this affliction, but not feisty Ella: “Instead of making me docile, Lucinda’s curse made a rebel of me. Or perhaps I was that way naturally.” When her beloved mother dies, leaving her in the care of a mostly absent and avaricious father, and later, a loathsome stepmother and two treacherous stepsisters, Ella’s life and well-being seem to be in grave peril. But her intelligence and saucy nature keep her in good stead as she sets out on a quest for freedom and self-discovery as she tries to track down Lucinda to undo the curse, fending off ogres, befriending elves, and falling in love with a prince along the way. Yes, there is a pumpkin coach, a glass slipper, and a happily ever after, but this is the most remarkable, delightful, and profound version of Cinderella you’ll ever read.

Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

Memoirs of a GeishaPublished in 1997

This book was one of my first bouts into adult fiction back when I was a teenager. The story has stuck with me (and the movie is fantastic, btw). It follows the (fictionalized) memoir of a young girl who is taken into a Geisha house and trained in the arts of being a Geisha. It’s somewhat historically accurate for the time, but mostly it’s just a fascinating and engaging read. I really, really enjoyed this book.

From Goodreads:

In Memoirs of a Geisha, we enter a world where appearances are paramount; where a girl’s virginity is auctioned to the highest bidder; where women are trained to beguile the most powerful men; and where love is scorned as illusion. It is a unique and triumphant work of fiction – at once romantic, erotic, suspenseful – and completely unforgettable.

Rave Master by Hiro Mashima

Rave Master, Vol. 1Published in 1999

Yet another nostalgic one on my part. This series is a pretty long one, but it’s very easy to get into – it has action, humor, and all sorts of goofiness. It’s along the lines of One Piece and Fairy Tale in the out-there-ness sometimes, so if you like either of those, you’ll likely like this too 😀

From Goodreads:

The Continent of Song is in chaos. The sinister secret society known as Demon Card is using the power of Dark Bring to destroy everything in their path. The only things capable of stopping Dark Bring are the Rave stones. Unfortunately, the Rave Stones were scattered around the globe in an explosion 50 years ago, so now they must be collected by the Rave Master in order to stop Dark Bring once and for all.


And that’s it! Happy reading! :”D

 
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Posted by on 08/12/2017 in Books

 

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Monthly Recs: Auto-Read Authors

Monthly Recommendations Base

Hello! I’ve decided to pick up a new meme – this one is monthly, so I figured it’ll be doable to keep up with. :”D It’s called Monthly Recommendations and you can find out more about it here if you would like. Basically, they give you a topic each month and you make a post about it. So here is mine, woo.

I have a couple auto-reads that I’d like to mention:


Neal Stephenson

Neal StephensonBook that made me smitten with this author: Snow Crash

Goodreads Synopsis:

In reality, Hiro Protagonist delivers pizza for Uncle Enzo’s CosoNostra Pizza Inc., but in the Metaverse he’s a warrior prince. Plunging headlong into the enigma of a new computer virus that’s striking down hackers everywhere, he races along the neon-lit streets on a search-and-destroy mission for the shadowy virtual villain threatening to bring about infocalypse. Snow Crash is a mind-altering romp through a future America so bizarre, so outrageous…you’ll recognize it immediately.

You should read if: You want a Ready Player One that’s not juvenile, what it could have been if it had been a more fleshed out, character-driven book.

Books I own by this author: Snow Crash, Diamond Age, Interface, Quicksilver, Confusion, System World

Robin Hobb

Robin HobbBook that made me smitten with this author: Assassin’s Apprentice

Goodreads Synopsis:

Young Fitz is the bastard son of the noble Prince Chivalry, raised in the shadow of the royal court by his father’s gruff stableman. He is treated as an outcast by all the royalty except the devious King Shrewd, who has him secretly tutored in the arts of the assassin. For in Fitz’s blood runs the magic Skill–and the darker knowledge of a child raised with the stable hounds and rejected by his family.

As barbarous raiders ravage the coasts, Fitz is growing to manhood. Soon he will face his first dangerous, soul-shattering mission. And though some regard him as a threat to the throne, he may just be the key to the survival of the kingdom.

You should read if: You want to fall into a 90s fantasy kick for about 6 months…. because that’s what happened when I picked up this book.

Books I own by this author: Assassin’s Apprentice, Royal Assassin, Assassin’s Quest, Ship of Magic, The Mad Ship, Ship of Destiny, Fool’s Errand, Shaman’s Crossing

Naomi Novik

Naomi NovikBook that made me smitten with this author: His Majesty’s Dragon

Goodreads Synopsis:

Aerial combat brings a thrilling new dimension to the Napoleonic Wars as valiant warriors ride mighty fighting dragons, bred for size or speed. When HMS Reliant captures a French frigate and seizes the precious cargo, an unhatched dragon egg, fate sweeps Captain Will Laurence from his seafaring life into an uncertain future – and an unexpected kinship with a most extraordinary creature. Thrust into the rarified world of the Aerial Corps as master of the dragon Temeraire, he will face a crash course in the daring tactics of airborne battle. For as France’s own dragon-borne forces rally to breach British soil in Bonaparte’s boldest gambit, Laurence and Temeraire must soar into their own baptism of fire.

You should read if: You like fantasy or historical fiction. This is both! It’s so good – so well thought out, so tactical, so heart-twanging! It’s one of my all-time favorites

Books I own by this author: His Majesty’s Dragon, Throne of Jade, Black Powder War, Empire of Ivory, Victory of Eagles, Tongues of Serpents, Blood of Tyrants, Uprooted

Alan Campbell

Alan CampbellBook that made me smitten with this author: Scar Night

Goodreads Synopsis:

Suspended by chains over a seemingly bottomless abyss, the ancient city of Deepgate is home to a young angel, an assassin, and a psychotic murderer hungry for revenge or redemption. But soon a shocking betrayal will unite all three in a desperate quest…. The last of his line, Dill is descended from legendary Battle-archons who once defended the city. Forbidden to fly and untrained even to wield the great sword inherited from his forebears, he has become a figurehead for a dying tradition. Now he lives a sheltered existence in one of Deepgate’s crumbling temple spires under the watchful eye of the Presbyter who rules the city. Spine assassin Rachel Hael has better things to do than oversee the Presbyter’s angel. Each dark moon she must fight for her life among the city chains, hunting an immortal predator with a taste for blood. But when a traitor brings enemies to Deepgate’s doorstep, Dill and Rachel are forced into an uneasy alliance with the city’s oldest and most dangerous foe. They must journey down into the uncharted chasm to save their sprawling metropolis and themselves from annihilation. Once they descend however, they learn that what lies below is far more sinister than what they’ve been taught to expect.

You should read if: You like steampunk, fantasy, fascinating worlds, anti-heroes

Books I own by this author: Scar Night, Iron Angel, God of Clocks, Sea of Ghosts


I figured instead of me saying ‘AHHH THEY’RE SO GOOD, READ THEM!’ over and over for each author, I’d let the synopses of their works speak for themselves. If you have read any of these authors’ books or plan to, do let me know. :”D Happy reading!

 
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Posted by on 07/15/2017 in Books

 

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Bookish Gift Recommendations – Blogmas 12/10

Hello! Today I’m gonna poke out some recommendations for books by genre. :”D

So here goes nothin’ and I’m going to really try not to recommend Harry Potter:


Book Recommendations:

Fantasy:

Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, #1)Ages 10-15: Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer. This series revolves around a 12 year old mastermind and his butler as he tries to earn by his family’s fortune and fame by capturing a fairy and ransoming her for hostage. This book is funny, action-packed and written on a level that this age group (and probably some younger) can enjoy. The Diviners (The Diviners, #1)

Ages 15-18: The Diviners by Libba Bray. Set in the 1920s, this is a horror with fantastical elements, I’d say. Not a straight up fantasy. People older than this age group would enjoy this as well, but I put it here because of the content. It’s good but doesn’t have any gruesome violence or explicit sex. So here it be.

UprootedAges 18+: Uprooted by Naomi Novik. I know I’ve mentioned this one to death at this point, but I seriously think it’s something everyone could enjoy. Reminiscent of Beauty and the Beast, this is a dark and interesting take on the tale. Full of whimsy and grittiness and magic, this is a book that’s stuck with me long after I finished it. Content though makes me feel it should be for older audiences, but hey, it’s your call.

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Science Fiction:

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1)All ages: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. There are so many good scifis I could recommend, but this one is sticking out to me like a sore thumb. This book was so enjoyable, so funny, so entertaining and so memorable that I’m already wanting to reread it and I haven’t even finished the series yet. If you have a scifi fan, a humor fan or just a book fan in general, this would be a good book for them.

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Young Adult:Ella Enchanted

Ages 10-15: Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine. Particularly I recommend this one to young girls but I feel boys could get just as much enjoyment out of it. This book has a strong-willed female lead character that defies her fate and has a good mind. I feel she’s a positive role model and I know growing up that I felt like I could relate to her.

The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling, #1)Ages 15+: The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen. Warning, this one does have a bit of adult content and is questionably ‘Young Adult’ but I thought that it was good enough to be mentioned. This book surprised me with how good it was. It has the unique setting of a regressed Earth – hundreds of years in the future of our planet, but society has regressed to an almost medieval one. The book takes place on a continent that appeared out of the ocean and is littered with references to modern day. It’s interesting for sure.

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Literary Fiction:

Memoirs of a GeishaAges 18+: Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. This book was one of the first literary fictions I had ever read and it’s definitely stuck with me. It’s a good gateway book to those centered around Japanese culture – I’ve since hunted down more books written or dictated by actual geisha and learned even more than this fictional account entails. I really value this book and what it did for me as far as awareness of other cultures and practices, with its accuracies and inaccuracies both.

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Graphic Novels:Awakening (Monstress, #1)

Ages 18+: Monstress by Marjorie M Liu. This is a fascinating graphic novel set in an alternative history Asia and revolves around a young woman and a monster. It’s dark, it’s gritty, it’s steampunk, and I loved it. The best thing about this series is that this is the only volume currently. If you pick it up now, you can follow it as the issues are released! :”D

Manga:

Fruits Basket, Vol. 1Ages 13+: Fruits Basket by Natsuki Takaya. This is probably one of the cutest series I’ve read. It follows a young girl and a family cursed to change into animals of the zodiac when hugged by the opposite sex. It’s funny, cute and adorable. Appropriate for younger audiences, too.Rurouni Kenshin, Volume 01

Ages 16+: Rurouni Kenshin by Nobuhiro Watsuki. This is one of my favorite series ever. Set in Meiji Era Japan, it follows a man who was once a manslayer in the revolution, but has since cast aside his killing ways and promised to right his wrongs by protecting all that he can and never, ever taking another life. This series is wonder – it’s funny, action packed, heart-wrenching. It’s good.

Ikigami: The Ultimate Limit, Volume 1 (Ikigami, #1)Ages 18+: Ikigami: The Ultimate Limit by Motoro Mase. As far as dystopians go, this one is pretty damn dark. In a society where life is to be valued, the government enforces a mandatory slaughtering of citizens via an injection that is given to everyone as a child. Usually, the injection is just a booster, but one is however many is lethal and will sit in that person until a designated time and date. 24 hours before that point, that person is delivered an ikigami – a death notice. This story follows all these people during their last 24 hours of life. It’s dark, it’s unnerving and it’s very unsettlingly close to home at times. Defintiely a mature rating on this one, so be warned.


And that’s it for the recommendations. If you have any for me, throw’em at me.

Happy reading. :”D

 

 

 
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Posted by on 12/10/2016 in Blogmas, Books

 

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Top 5 Wednesday: Spooky Settings

Top 5 Wednesday

First time in a long time that I’ve done a Top 5 Wednesday post (or posted regularly at all, whoop). This week’s theme is spooky settings, both ones I’ve seen in books and one I would like to see in books. So this is going to be a more… wordy post. If anybody knows a book that fits any of the settings I describe, do let me know, won’t you. The T5W group can be found here if you’d like to participate.


FiveThe Forest of Hands and Teeth (The Forest of Hands and Teeth, #1)

I really enjoy settings with cultist or religion-gone-crazy overtones, especially if the entirety of exactly what this group of people is doing doesn’t come to light right away. I love that moment of horror, of realization that I get when I see what is truly happening within the group. It’s unsettling and the reason I love it so much is because it’s the most real. People join groups and do horrible things all the time – I’m not condoning or encouraging people to join a cult or anything, but knowing that it could happen makes the book all the more chilling. A good example of this is The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan. The main character lives in a town surrounded by fences. On the outside of those fences are the rest of what once was humanity. As the book progresses, the reader sees that the horrors outside the fence might be matched by the horrors within. It’s so good, it’s so unsettling, it’s so goooood. Another example could be the latest season of American Horror Story: Roanoke. I’m not going to go into detail, but it’s the first season that’s actually frightened me in a long while.

Four

Pitch Black PosterThe fear of the unknown is an excellent driver of horror in my book. Anything where the characters are surrounded by potential horror but they don’t know for sure. The movie Pitch Black is a good example of this. The characters find themselves on a planet covered in darkness and they can’t see or know what lies within it. Jump scares are common in this kind of writing/viewing and are usually super effective on me.

This could also apply to horrors that aren’t supernatural at all – being stranded in the ocean for example or lost in space. The movie Gravity terrified me even though it wasn’t technically a ‘horror’. The fear of getting lost or abandoned kept crawling up my skin while watching it and I couldn’t shake it for a while afterwards. Yuck, I love it.

ThreeTrollhunter Poster

Monsters. I know that’s a cop-out in general to say ‘Monsters’ but I mean it. Monsters! Big ones, vicious ones, ruthless ones. Ones that don’t see humans as anything but prey. That’s what scares me. The thought of being devolved into nothing but meat. Three good examples of this are Attack on Titan, both the manga and the anime (watch it, oh my gosh – it’s available on Netflix), Troll Hunter (also on Netflix) and The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey. All three call into question my humanity in the sense that… I may be a person, have my own thoughts, feelings and ideas, but there will always be something that doesn’t see that, that only sees the flesh on my bones. It’s creepy, I don’t like it, but I can’t get enough.

Two

Paranormal Activity PosterOne of my favorite horror elements is something that Paranormal Activity captures pretty well. Camera feeds. It’s always so nerve-wracking for me to watch a still feed and just have to wait for something to happen. I know it’s going to happen, but it still scares the doody out of me.

Another thing the camera incorporates is the low-pitched sound when something is approaching. A lot of testimony of people who claim to have seen ghosts or demons or whatever often mention hearing that sound and I think it’s great when it’s incorporated.

One

My absolute very creepy setting is when the audience is involved in the horror. You the reader are involved. The best example I have of this is actually from an ongoing series written on the /r/nosleep subreddit on reddit (btw, /r/nosleep has a lot of spooky stuff on there if you want scary things to read). This series I’m talking about in particular is simply called ‘Correspondance‘ and was written by a user named ‘bloodstains’. It starts as a simple email correspondance and slowly devolves into horror. The writer involves the reader through technology. Pictures mentioned that have been ‘attached’ to the emails are linked in the posts, videos are linked. It allows the reader to see what the characters are seeing, hear what they’re hearing. It’s really unsettling, especially if you’re reading it in the dark by yourself. It’s like… do I really want to click on this link? Do I really want to see what’s being talked about? It’s creepy, it’s unnerving and it’s wonderful.

If you decide to read this one and are unfamiliar with reddit, know that after you finish the first bit of the series, you can click on the username that wrote it to access the next bits.

This is my favorite method of horror. It allows me to be in it but still at a safe distance.


Happy reading

 
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Posted by on 10/26/2016 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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Top 5 Wednesday: Recommended Reads

Top 5 Wednesday

Happy Hump Day. This week’s topic is top books that were recommended to you. Since a lot of the books I read are recommended to me through the internet, I’m going to to with books that were recommended to me by people physically around me. Also, I’m going to leave out my two all-time favorites series (The Deepgate Codex and The Temeraire series) because I just gooed about them in my last post. But they were both recommendations to me as well. So anyways, here we go~

5. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson

Snow Crash

Recommended to me by: The SO

I recommend this to you if: You liked ‘Ready Player One’ or are looking for some nice, dense sci-fi.

Goodreads synopsis:

In reality, Hiro Protagonist delivers pizza for Uncle Enzo’s CosoNostra Pizza Inc., but in the Metaverse he’s a warrior prince. Plunging headlong into the enigma of a new computer virus that’s striking down hackers everywhere, he races along the neon-lit streets on a search-and-destroy mission for the shadowy virtual villain threatening to bring about infocalypse. Snow Crash is a mind-altering romp through a future America so bizarre, so outrageous…you’ll recognize it immediately.

4. The Diary of Ma Yan

Recommended to me by: The SOThe Diary of Ma Yan: The Struggles and Hopes of a Chinese Schoolgirl

I recommend this to you if: You like memoir, Asian culture and are looking for something a bit sad.

Goodreads synopsis:

Wednesday, November 7

My father gave me and my brother a little money. My stomach is all twisted up with hunger, but I don’t want to spend the money on anything as frivolous as food. Because it’s money my parents earn with their sweat and blood.

I have to study well so that I won’t ever again be tortured by hunger. . . .

In a drought-stricken corner of rural China, an education can be the difference between a life of crushing poverty and the chance for a better future. But money is scarce, and the low wages paid for backbreaking work aren’t always enough to pay school fees.

Ma Yan’s heart-wrenching, honest diary chronicles her struggle to escape hardship and bring prosperity to her family through her persistent, sometimes desperate, attempts to continue her schooling.

First published in France in 2002, the diary of ma yan created an outpouring of support for this courageous teenager and others like her — support that led to the creation of an international organization dedicated to helping these children . . . all because of one ordinary girl’s extraordinary diary.

3. Angels and Demons by Dan Brown

Recommended to me by: The SO (are you noticing a pattern here)Angels & Demons (Robert Langdon, #1)

I recommend this to you if: You enjoy religious and conspiratorial themes, you enjoy thrillers, you like Peter Clines’ writing or if you don’t mind short shorts being mentioned every other page.

Goodreads synopsis:

World-renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a cryptic symbol seared into the chest of a murdered physicist. What he discovers is unimaginable: a deadly vendetta against the Catholic Church by a centuries-old underground organization— the Illuminati. Desperate to save the Vatican from a powerful time bomb, Langdon joins forces in Rome with the beautiful and mysterious scientist Vittoria Vetra. Together they embark on a frantic hunt through sealed crypts, dangerous catacombs, deserted cathedrals, and the most secretive vault on the earth… the long-forgotten Illuminati lair.

2. The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

Recommended to me by: A very good friendThe Monstrumologist (The Monstrumologist, #1)

I recommend this to you if: You want to read horror but aren’t sure where to start, you disliked The 5th Wave but want to give Rick Yancey another chance (this is waaaay better, trust me) or you enjoy reading about really cool looking creatures

Goodreads synopsis:

‘These are the secrets I have kept. This is the trust I never betrayed. But he is dead now and has been for more than forty years, the one who gave me his trust, the one for whom I kept these secrets. The one who saved me . . . and the one who cursed me.

So starts the diary of Will Henry, orphaned assistant to Dr. Pellinore Warthrop, a man with a most unusual specialty: monstrumology, the study of monsters. In his time with the doctor, Will has met many a mysterious late-night visitor, and seen things he never imagined were real. But when a grave robber comes calling in the middle of the night with a gruesome find, he brings with him their most deadly case yet.

A gothic tour de force that explores the darkest heart of man and monster and asks the question: When does man become the very thing he hunts?

1. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Recommend to my by: My cousinThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1)

I recommend this to you if: You like humor, sci-fi, classics or just general goofiness.

Goodreads synopsis:

Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last fifteen years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor.

Together this dynamic pair begin a journey through space aided by quotes from The Hitchhiker’s Guide (“A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have”) and a galaxy-full of fellow travelers: Zaphod Beeblebrox–the two-headed, three-armed ex-hippie and totally out-to-lunch president of the galaxy; Trillian, Zaphod’s girlfriend (formally Tricia McMillan), whom Arthur tried to pick up at a cocktail party once upon a time zone; Marvin, a paranoid, brilliant, and chronically depressed robot; Veet Voojagig, a former graduate student who is obsessed with the disappearance of all the ballpoint pens he bought over the years.


This week’s topic was pretty fun! I figured posting the synopses of the books would be better than my butchered version of a summary.

As always, T5W was created by Lainey, and here is where you can find the full list of posters if you’d like to join as well. Happy reading!

 

 
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Posted by on 02/17/2016 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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Top 5 Wednesday: Halloween Recommendations

I’m so excited for this topic. Halloween is a fun holiday, though I really don’t do much for it aside from read books, haha. Someone invite me to a Halloween party, dammit.

T5W was created by Lainey, and here is the list of posters if you’d like to join.

Here are my top Halloween Recommendations:

5. Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix

Horrorstör

This book showed up a lot last year during Halloween and for good reason. This is a pretty funny horror story. This book is set in an Ikea knockoff store and it reads like a catalog. It starts off with simple things like chairs and tables and stuff, but as the main story progresses, the advertisements slowly turn into more gruesome and creepy devices. The story itself is pretty entertaining, though not exactly 100% original. It’s like watching a typical horror movie in a book, but with the entertaining twist that I mentioned. Overall, it’s totally worth a read if you’re looking for something creepy and something fast.

4. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

FrankensteinI hope that this one will be on a lot of lists today. It’s a classic!

Frankenstein is one of those books I was forced to read in high school and ended up loving. If you haven’t read it yet and are looking to get into classics, why not start here? It’s good timing.

3. The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

The Monstrumologist (The Monstrumologist, #1)This book man. This book. Rick Yancey. Have you read is 5th Wave book? Did you notice how he has a bit of difficulty writing romance? Well, that problem only deals with romance. With horror, he. is. in. his. element. I dreamed about the monsters in this book for days after finishing it. It was so gritty and dark. It had me fearing they were gonna jump out of the shadows of my closet. Reading this book was an experience, and I highly recommend it.

It follows the apprentice of a mad scientist, a Monstrumologist, as they investigate and capture monsters that I couldn’t even dream up in my worst nightmare. Buh. I’m uneasy just thinking about it.

2. Lord Loss by Darren Shan

Lord Loss (The Demonata, #1)I read this book a long while ago, so I don’t remember too much about it other than the completely consuming feeling of horror and disgust I felt while reading it. I think I’m going to try to re-read it soon This is the first book in the Demonata series and from what I’ve heard, the rest are just as good.

This book is fantastic. It has demons and werewolves and chess. Chess. Chess is scary in here. It’s awesome.

1. Diabolo by Kei Kusunoki

Diabolo: Volume 1

This manga is definitely my top pick. It’s about two boys who sell their souls to the devil in exchange for someone’s life. And then they think all is fine and dandy. It’s a soul right? They don’t need it while they’re alive. But then things start to get weird. Maybe you do need your soul.

This series is unnerving, creepy and riveting. I loved reading this. It gave me goosebumps. This series is only three volumes long, so you could easily get through the whole thing in a couple hours. Highly, highly recommend it.

Have you read any of these? Do you have any recs for me based on these? :”D Please and thank you, happy reading!

 
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Posted by on 10/28/2015 in Books, Top 5 Wednesday

 

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Bout of Books 14 Challenge: What to Read Next

I’m participating in the What to Read Next challenge for the Bout of Books 14 readathon. This challenge is hosted by Sarah from Sarah Reads Too Much. To make an entry, I need to recommend three books that I’ve read this year and say a bit about them. If you’ve been following my blog at all, you’ve probably seen me gooing and gaaing about these books earlier in the year. So here we go~ :”D

Trigun: Deep Space Planet Future Gun Action!! # 1 (Trigun, #1)My first recommendation was a reread for me this year and is for those who have recently discovered they like graphic novels, maybe have read through two or three series and now aren’t sure where to turn. If you’re in this situation, I highly recommend you check out Trigun by Yasuhiro Nightow. This is a manga that is set in the future on a desert planet colonized by humans. It follows the main character Vash the Stampede, who is a wanted man with a $$60,000,000,000 bounty on his head for the destruction of several towns and cities. It seems no matter where this man goes, chaos follows, earning him the nickname ‘The Humanoid Typhoon’. The funny thing is though, through all the ruin and rubble, Vash has never taken a life. It turns out he’s a goofball with a donut obsession. A sharpshooter and a teddy bear. Always alert and always hungry.

The genre for Trigun is a mix: Sci-fi, western, comedy, action… it has a bit of everything. Aside from those just getting into graphic novels, I also recommend this series to anyone who has been into them for a while and is just looking for the next thing, fans of Firefly, fans of spaghetti westerns and fans of comedy. Trigun is considered a classic by manga standards and it certainly earns its’ title. It also comes in anime form, so if you’d rather check that out, go for it. Both the show and the manga are of excellent quality.The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1)

My second recommendation is a book that a lot of people have probably already read but I just got to earlier this year. It is The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. This is a classic sci-fi comedy about a man named Arthur Dent who is whisked aboard as stowaway into an alien vessel when Earth is destroyed to make way for a new super highway across the galaxy. Apparently the plans had been in the Galactic meeting hall for hundred of years and none of us humans had though to check on it.

This book is full of quick wit and dry humor. Often times a joke is delivered before you realize it’s being set up. Arthur Dent is a wonderfully bleak character and in combination with his friend Ford and his copy of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy that has the large words ‘DON’T PANIC’ written on the front of it and the super depressed and cynical robot named Marvin, the book is filled with colorful characters that drive the plot forward. To give you an idea of some of the humor in this book, read this excerpt from it:

Another thing that got forgotten was the fact that against all probability a sperm whale had suddenly been called into existence several miles above the surface of an alien planet.

And since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this poor innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity as a whale before it then had to come to terms with not being a whale any more.

This is a complete record of its thoughts from the moment it began its life till the moment it ended it.

Ah … ! What’s happening? it thought. Er, excuse me, who am I? Hello? Why am I here? What’s my purpose in life? What do I mean by who am I? Calm down, get a grip now … oh! this is an interesting sensation, what is it? It’s a sort of … yawning, tingling sensation in my … my … well I suppose I’d better start finding names for things if I want to make any headway in what for the sake of what I shall call an argument I shall call the world, so let’s call it my stomach.

Good. Ooooh, it’s getting quite strong. And hey, what’s about this whistling roaring sound going past what I’m suddenly going to call my head? Perhaps I can call that … wind! Is that a good name? It’ll do … perhaps I can find a better name for it later when I’ve found out what it’s for. It must be something very important because there certainly seems to be a hell of a lot of it. Hey! What’s this thing? This … let’s call it a tail – yeah, tail. Hey! I can can really thrash it about pretty good can’t I? Wow! Wow! That feels great! Doesn’t seem to achieve very much but I’ll probably find out what it’s for later on. Now – have I built up any coherent picture of things yet?

No. Never mind, hey, this is really exciting, so much to find out about, so much to look forward to, I’m quite dizzy with anticipation … Or is it the wind? There really is a lot of that now isn’t it? And wow! Hey! What’s this thing suddenly coming towards me very fast? Very very fast. So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like … ow … ound … round … ground! That’s it! That’s a good name – ground!

I wonder if it will be friends with me?

And the rest, after a sudden wet thud, was silence.

Curiously enough, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias as it fell was Oh no, not again. Many people have speculated that if we knew exactly why the bowl of petunias had thought that we would know a lot more about the nature of the universe than we do now.”

Perdido Street Station (Bas-Lag, #1)And finally, my third recommendation is for those who like weird, dense fantasy and it is Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. If you’ve never read anything by this author before, I recommend starting here. Perdido Street Station is the train station that sits in the city of New Crobuzon, which dwells in the middle of the giant ribcage of some long-dead creature. This book I feel is more about the city than the characters. The characters are definitely interesting, don’t get me wrong – a mad scientist, an ambassador from hell, a woman with a beetle for a head, multiple creatures with wings, and a garuda – a large bird-like creature that has appeared in both Hindu and Buddhist writings – that has lost his wings and his honor. But I feel these characters would be nothing without the complex, winding city the book takes place in. New Crobuzon to me feels like a bazaar, always busy, always foreign yet at the same time, enticing and foreboding. There are a couple subplots that happen throughout this book that tie in together in a way that is fascinating and bizarre. Reading this book is like blowing life into this city. You’ll think about it when you’re done, you’ll pine to wander its streets. I read this book back in January, finished it on the 2nd or 3rd of the month, and I still think about it. I miss this book, if that makes sense. So yes, this is my third rec. Hope you enjoy.

 
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Posted by on 08/23/2015 in Books, Readathon

 

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